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Ajs

Ajs

Displaying 1 to 50 (of 50 products)
Displaying 1 to 50 (of 50 products)


AJs is and was the name of a company that produced motorbikes and cars. In England, both were made from 1909 until 1931. In 1931, the company held over 117 motorbike world records. The firm was sold later that year where the name continued to be used by Matchless, Associated Motorcycles and Norton-Villiers. Until 1969, four stroke motorbikes were produced. Since 1974, when the name resold, lightweight, two stroke scramblers have been created for smaller size roadsters and cruisers. Today, AJs workshop manuals can be utilized in order to maintain AJs models.

The history of AJs motorbikes started with a father and sons company in Wednesfield, England. The father and sons consisted of Joe Stevens, the father, and the sons – Harry, George, Albert, and Joe. They specialized in engineering and built their first motorbike in 1897 using a single-cylinder, four-stroke imported from the United States. Eventually, after creating numerous motorbikes with all kinds of engines, the company was founded – AJs which stood for A J Stevens and Co. Their first manufactured motorbike appeared at a Motor Cycle Show in 1910.

Throughout the years, the family underwent many changes to the company. Aside from engine updates and design improvements, there were also a significant amount of changes to the family side of the company. Albert, one of the sons lent his initials to the company which later became a concern. Harry, another son was a managing director of the entire operation. Joe junior led the experimental section and Albert acted as the production manager.

For a period of time, AJs worked with Meadows to create a few experimental vehicles. In 1923, they launched a few vehicles that used the Meadows engines. However, they didn’t end up deciding to push them to production. Prior to the collaboration with Meadows, AJs had partnered with Clyno to manufacture car bodies but Clyno ended up collapsing in business.

While AJs did end up going bankrupt in 1931, their motorbikes live on to this day. Their assets were bought out by the Collier Brothers London Company Matchless and Crossley Motors. Crossley used a lot of AJs’ original designs but implemented a variety of improvements to their motorbikes.

Eventually AJs were raced under the brand AMC. Their racing history reflects the pinnacle of motorbike racing and still lives on to this day. While the majority of these motorbikes are branded under other companies, they can still be maintained through an AJs service manual.