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Vitara

Displaying 1 to 100 (of 184 products)
Displaying 1 to 100 (of 184 products)


The Suzuki Vitara is a compact SUV manufactured since 1988, by Suzuki. The second and third-generation models were named the Suzuki Grand Vitara, with the fourth and current series eschewing this prefix. Moreover, when showing your Vitara some TLC, don't forget that a Suzuki Vitara workshop manual maybe just the tool you need to get the job done.

Initially, the series was designed to fill the space above the Suzuki Jimny. The first generation was called the Suzuki Sidekick in the US. The North American version was manufactured by Suzuki and General Motors as a joint venture and was known as CAMI.

First introduced in 1988, the Escudo was initially released in the Japanese domestic market. The North American Sidekick became available the year after ─ 1989 ─ as a two-door hardtop or convertible. Fuel injected 80 hp 1.6 L eight-valve 4-cylinder Suzuki G16 engine was offered on the JX and JLX. In 1990, the JLX was discontinued.

In August 1990, the Japanese market got a sixteen-valve version with 99 hp as well as an optional 4-speed automatic. For the 1992 model year, a 95 hp 1.6-L 16-valve Suzuki G16A engine was launched in the United States. In 1996, the original Sidekick was updated with a new Sport version available with 120 hp 1.8 L 16-valve 4-cylinder Suzuki J18 engine. There is also a limited edition named the Vitara Rossini, which came in metallic pink with a cream leather interior; however, only 250 of this model were produced worldwide.

In 1994, a 2.0 V6 (Suzuki's first 6-cylinder) and a 2.0 L Mazda-sourced turbodiesel were included. A diesel option became available in Europe in early 1996. That same year, the Vitara received a facelift, which meant that the V6 was upsized to 2.5 L while a 2.0 L 4-cylinder was slotted into the range. The Suzuki X-90 vanished from Suzuki's lineup after the 1998 model year, and in 1999, the Sport variant was replaced with the Grand Vitara.

In 1998, the 1999 model year was announced. It was slightly larger, a bit pricier, and more powerful. The three-door version remained in the mini SUV class, while the five-door version was classed as a compact SUV. In many markets, it was initially only available with larger ─ two liters and up ─ engines while the older Vitara was still offered with the smaller engines. In the United Kingdom, a 1.6 L Grand Vitara (the GV1600) made a splash in 2001.

In 2002, it was already being facelifted. A rebadged version was marketed in North America by General Motors as the Chevrolet Tracker. The Tracker was marketed in Latin America - excluding Mexico - as Chevrolet Grand Vitara. In 2003, the smaller Suzuki Vitara had been withdrawn from the North American market. The soft-top was only manufactured in North America.

In 2008, the Suzuki Grand Vitara was given a facelift and two new engines. A Suzuki 2.4 L inline four was the engine of choice. It produced 166 hp of power and 163 lb⋅ft of torque. The previous 2.7L Suzuki V6 was replaced by a GM-sourced 3.2L V6. The V6 was only available in the flagship prestige model which produced 231 hp of power and 213 lb⋅ft of torque. Fuel economy had also been improved in all the engines. Various safety features were enhanced as well.

In 2018, Suzuki debuted a renewed variant of the Vitara at the Paris Motor Show as a milestone of its 30th anniversary in. So, remember if you ever need help servicing your Vitara, having a Suzuki Vitara repair manual can make the job go smoother.