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Subaru

Subaru



Subaru is the auto manufacturing division of the Japanese transportation conglomerate Subaru Corporation. Subaru vehicles are known for their use of a boxer engine layout in most vehicles above 1500 cc. The Symmetrical AWD drive-train layout was introduced in 1972. By 1996, the flat and boxer engine and AWD became standard for mid-size and smaller vehicles in the international auto market. The lone exception, introduced in 2012 via a partnership with Toyota, is the BRZ which uses the boxer engine but instead uses an RWD. Turbocharged Subarus are also offered such as the Impreza WRX and previously the Legacy GT and Forester XT. However, don't forget if you are tuning your Subaru, double check and make sure you have a Subaru service manual to make the job go well.

Subaru was named in Japanese for the Pleiades star cluster M45, aka the ""Seven Sisters;"" one of whom is traditionally seen as being invisible – hence only six stars in the Subaru logo.

Originally, in 1915, Fuji Heavy Industries started out as the Aircraft Research Laboratory. The company later became known as Nakajima Aircraft Company, Ltd, in 1932, and rapidly became a major aircraft manufacturer for Japan during World War II. After the war, Nakajima Aircraft was reorganized and became known as Fuji Sangyo Co, Ltd. The company created the Fuji Rabbit in 1946, from spare aircraft parts. Fuji Sangyo was broken up into 12 smaller corporations as required by the Japanese government's 1950 Corporate Credit Rearrangement Act. Between 1953 and 1955, five of these twelve corporations and a newly formed corporation merged to form Fuji Heavy Industries. The five companies were: coachbuilder, Fuji Jidosha; scooter manufacturer, Fuji Kogyo; engine manufacturer, Omiya Fuji Kogyo; Tokyo Fuji Dangyo trading company and chassis builder, Utsunomiya Sharyo.

In 1968, during the government-ordered merging of the Japanese auto industry, Nissan acquired a 20.4% stake in Fuji Heavy Industries, Subaru's parent company. This government merging was instituted to improve competitiveness. Nissan used this merge to use FHI's bus manufacturing expertise and capability for their Diesel line of buses. Similarly, many Subaru vehicles use Nissan parts.

In 1999, When Nissan was acquired by Renault, its stock in FHI was sold to General Motors. General Motors, Troy Clarke, served as representative to Fuji Heavy Industries on their corporate board. During that time, Subaru debuted the Baja (2003) and the Tribeca (2005). During the General Motors period, a badge-engineered Impreza was marketed in the United States as the Saab 9-2X.

In 2005, GM liquidated its holdings in FHI. Most Saab-Subaru joint projects were closed, other than Subaru supplying parts for the Saab 9-2x. Toyota bought a tad over 40% of GM's former FHI stock, amounting to a total of 8.7% of FHI. Subaru and Toyota have since collaborated on several projects. Toyota increased its holdings in FHI to 16.5% in July 2008.

Today, Subaru is doing well. They have historically been at the forefront of the subcompact sector of the auto industry. Time and time again, they have proven to maintain their reputation for making reliable vehicles. So, if you ever find yourself in need of help repairing your Subaru go grab one of our Subaru repair manuals to help you along your journey of auto repair.