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Cooper / Hatch

Displaying 1 to 100 (of 193 products)
Displaying 1 to 100 (of 193 products)


The history of the MINI Cooper is, to say the least. As of the mid-2000s, the MINI Cooper was resurrected in BMWs takeover and relaunch of the marque as the Cooper and Cooper S variants, which have been successful. Beginning with the British Motor Corporation the Cooper's space-saving transverse engine and FWD layout allowed 80% of the floorpan's area to be used for passengers and luggage, making it a massive hit in England and abroad. However, before you tinker with your Cooper make sure you have a Mini Cooper service manual to get the job done right.

The birth of the Mini Cooper can be traced to BMC designer Sir Alex Issigonis, who started developing the Mini in the 1950s. The Mini was Issigonis's response to the Suez fuel crises England and others were suffering at the time. Featuring a 4 cylinder engine, and a two-door monocoque shell, the Mark I Mini was released in 1959. During the 1960s, the Mini's popularity made it an icon of the decade.

The Mini Cooper was a special version of the first generation Mini. John Cooper, of the Cooper Car Company, saw a potential in the Mini to create a motorsports version of the Mark Mini. In 1961, Copper launched the Mini Cooper, and the Mini Cooper S. The Cooper featured an 848 cc engine, while the S had a 1071 cc engine. The Cooper Ss popularity as the sportier version of the Mini was heightened by its subsequent wins at the Monte Carlo Rally in 1964, 1965, and 1967.

In the '70s and '80s, the Mini Coopers brand license pasted through many hands. New models were made during this time, but most continued to build on the original Cooper and Cooper S designs. By the 1990s, the Rover Group owned the rights to the Mini brand. BMW bought RG and with RG came the rights to the Mini brand. Although BMW sold RG at the end of the 1990s, BMW retained the Mini marque. Since the 2000s, they have revived the marque.

Important changes to the new Mini included a Toyota diesel engine, as well as convertible and hatch models. Further modifications were made to the Cooper to include concept cars and kits. The past years has consequently seen new Cooper, and Cooper S models. The Cooper brand continues to be a staple of the Minis appeal and doesn't appear to be going anywhere anytime soon. Make sure you grab your Mini Cooper repair manual today.