top line
Blog Banner
top bt line
top bt line
top bt line
top bt line

Mercury

Displaying 1 to 3 (of 3 products)
Displaying 1 to 3 (of 3 products)


Mercury was created in 1938, as a division of Ford Motor Company. From 1945 to 2010, Mercury shared its division with Lincoln as the Lincoln-Mercury division. Mercury has a reputation of making iconic vehicles. However, if your Mercury does end up having problems, having a Mercury service manual may help get the job done.

In the 1939 model year, Mercury made its debut with a namesake vehicle line. It had a 239 cu in version of the Flathead V8 producing 95 hp (71 kW;95 PS). Mercury adopted the Mercury Eight nameplate in 1941, and to consolidate development and production, the Mercury Eight shared much of its body shell with Ford. For the 1942 model year, the Flathead V8 was offered with 100 hp (75 kW;101 PS) in standard form. To compete with Fluid Drive and Hydramatic, the 1942 Mercury offered Liquamatic, the first semi-automatic transmission offered by Ford Motor Company. Following the instituting of Henry Ford II as Ford’s president, Ford merged Mercury and Lincoln into a combined Lincoln-Mercury division.

In 1950, the Mercury division of Ford consisted solely of the Mercury Eight. ""Merc-O-Matic"" drive was an automatic transmission Mercury adopted in 1951. In an effort to become more competitive, the Mercury redesigned the Eight in1952. The Flathead V8 was replaced, in 1954, by an overhead-valve Y-Block V8 and by 1958, Ford introduced its first big-block V8 in the Mercury Park Lane.

The economic recession of the late 1950s affected medium-priced brands the hardest, in the American automotive industry. Although, Lincoln-Mercury remained intact, but they suffered cutbacks to stay afloat. For 1960, Mercury entered the compact car market with the introduction of the Mercury Comet featuring a standard 90 hp inline-6 engine ---- the first Mercury ever sold without a V8 engine. For 1961, Mercury introduced full-size cars to their lineup. Mercury revised its model line in 1962, introducing the ""S"" sub-models with higher performance powertrains for non-station wagons.

By the middle of the roaring ‘60s, the Mercury division had secured its future. In 1965, the full-size models underwent a redesign with the slogan “built in the Lincoln tradition."" Mercury introduced two very successful vehicles, the Cougar and Marquis, in 1967. The full-size Mercury line endured another redesign in 1969, consolidating their nameplates solely to the Monterey, Marquis, and Colony Park station wagon.

During the 1970s, the Mercury division was influenced by several factors, including but not limited to the 1973 fuel crises. While sporty cars didn’t disappear from the brand, Mercury shifted their focus into making near-luxury vehicles. 1975, marked several changes in the Mercury line up. A new style emerged ---- the luxury compact car. The luxuriously compact Monarch was met with much success.

For 1977, the Montego line was replaced by the Cougar. The move proved successful; Cougar sales nearly tripled. In 1978, Mercury developed an all-new Fox platform, the RWD chassis would serve as the basis for many compact and mid-size Ford, and Lincoln-Mercury cars from the late 1970s up to the early 2000s.

The ‘80s and ‘90s, saw a continued move towards smaller more fuel efficient vehicles. Gone were the days of big blocks and roadsters. However, Mercury struggled to find the same success it had in its youth. In 2010, Ford announced the discontinuation of the Mercury brand.

And with that, Mercury faded away. However, Mercury’s discontinuation doesn’t mean that you can’t find them still being driven today. So, remember if you ever need help servicing your Mercury, having a Mercury repair manual can make the job go smoother.